Saturday, 4 July 2015

Welcome!

I was amazed and delighted this morning to discover an article about my blog (specifically this post about Ælfric's homily on the death of St Benedict) in the Telegraph. I've been reading Christopher Howse's column since I was a teenager, and it's long been a kind of model for me in how to write clearly, lyrically, and sensitively about the past - so this really was a thrill.

Anyone who has come here today on that recommendation, you're very welcome! Here are some links you might find helpful. This post explains why and how I blog about medieval texts; I do so in the hope of offering a glimpse at the richness and diversity of England's medieval literature and the many ways it can still delight, amuse, teach and guide. More extracts from the writings of the incomparable tenth-century homilist Ælfric can be found under this tag - representing just a tiny fraction of the work of this incredibly prolific, thoughtful and generous teacher and lucid writer of English prose. Here's a collection of links to posts about Anglo-Saxon literature exploring the cycle of the year, and here's more on the stories of medieval saints from Benedict to Dunstan, Edmund, Anselm, Etheldreda, and more. I hope you find something to interest you!

6 comments:

Tyrell Northcutt said...

I'm so pleased your blog is getting attention: I have often found consolation and enjoyment here. I studied Anglo-Saxon and Middle English in university, as a sideline to Greek and Latin: reading your blog has re-awakened my interest, and introduced me to new pleasures. I owe my introduction to Traherne to you, for which I shall always be grateful.

Catherine M said...

I love your blog. Thank you for sharing! I find it peaceful and enriching at the same time. I often put a link to particular articles for my my friends on Facebook.

Heliopause said...

Hello! I'm back after (what feels like) long absence, and am delighted to read this news! It's a joy that your beautiful and beautifully generous work is being made more widely known (and by someone you admire - even better!).

Clerk of Oxford said...

Hello! How nice to see you back again :)

Anonymous said...

I'm also a fan of Christopher Howse and came here because of his article.
Your blog looks fascinating. Thanks for the welcome.

Anonymous said...

Sir, you have become a new plank in my bridge of learning. What a delightful blog to educate myself about my ancestral culture. Member of former family of old Sarum and Salsbury, now in America.